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Adventures, all the time.

Mar 29 '14
follow-the-fishies:

I feel like this is what my baby would look like. 

follow-the-fishies:

I feel like this is what my baby would look like. 

Feb 27 '14
medievalpoc:

Anonymous French Jeweller
Cameo with the Bust of a Black Man and White Woman
France (16th century)
Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles.
from TheRoot.com:

Among the panoply of images displayed by the courtly circles of Renaissance Europe, a jewel-like cameo such as this example played its own unique role as a statement of politics and identity. Cameos were worn as a kind of badge of allegiance to an imperial cause, or mounted on elaborate table pieces as signs of rank and privilege.

medievalpoc:

Anonymous French Jeweller

Cameo with the Bust of a Black Man and White Woman

France (16th century)

Bibliothèque Nationale, Cabinet des Médailles.

from TheRoot.com:

Among the panoply of images displayed by the courtly circles of Renaissance Europe, a jewel-like cameo such as this example played its own unique role as a statement of politics and identity. Cameos were worn as a kind of badge of allegiance to an imperial cause, or mounted on elaborate table pieces as signs of rank and privilege.

Feb 22 '14
medievalpoc:

Anonymous Venetian Artist
Cameo With Bust of an African Boy
Italy (c. 1590)
Sardonyx and Gold, Overall: 5/8 x 7/16in. (1.6 x 1.1cm); visible cameo: 15.8 x 13.2 mm.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
[x] [x]

medievalpoc:

Anonymous Venetian Artist

Cameo With Bust of an African Boy

Italy (c. 1590)

Sardonyx and Gold, Overall: 5/8 x 7/16in. (1.6 x 1.1cm); visible cameo: 15.8 x 13.2 mm.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

[x] [x]

Feb 5 '14

human-chernobyl asked:

When you see a pack of 12-year-Olds walking out of Hot Topic covered with Invader Zim merch, do you feel all warm inside, or do you want to burn them with a flamethrower and nuke the entire site from orbit? (hey, it's the only way to be sure)

jhonenv:

Excellent ALIENS reference!

As for the matter of how I feel seeing the what you described, I don’t think anyone with a decent sense of perspective gives a shit what some kids are wearing. There’s a particular time in your life, usually your teens, where certain people just have to act angry about the stupidest, most weightless things, so that’s understandable and not exactly shocking to see people going on about things that I just shrug at, but you kinda hope that, after a bit of growing up, they move on and use their processing power on bigger deals, like whether Coke commercials are the gateway to white genocide.

Also, I can’t recall ever being near a Hot Topic and seeing kids walk out wearing my stuff for me to react to because A. I don’t hang out near Hot Topics, and B. Kids are invisible to me.

I think a good way to approach questions like these is, before asking, to ask yourself “Is Jhonen a grown man?” If you answer “YES.” then there’s a good chance stuff like kids wearing ZIM shirts probably doesn’t register too high on my list of things I want to change about the universe.

Feb 3 '14
Jan 7 '14

MedievalPOC: 2,000th Post Presents: The Medieval Reactions. All of Them, In No Particular Order and Utterly Without Context.

medievalpoc:

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I regret nothing.

Here’s to 2,000 more!

Nov 27 '13

medievalpoc:

queermindsfuckalike:

secretlesbians:

19th Century Queer Couples

1. 1891 – Photo by Alice Austen
2. 1855 – Martha O’Curry
3. 1890 – via  www.ChloeAndOlivia.wordpress.com
4. 1890 – via www.Flickr.com/photos/SShreeves
5. 1899 – via FYeahQueerVintage.tumblr.com
6. 1900 – Anna Moor and Elsie Dale
7. 1900 – Young couple seated in garden, from the Powerhouse Museum Collection, via HerSaturnReturns.com
8. Kitty Ely, Class of 1887 (L) and Helen Emory Class of 1889, Mount Holyoke Students, via VintagePhoto.Livejournal.com
9. 1900s
10. Lily Elise and Adrienne Augarde, 1907, via FYeahQueerVintage.tumblr.com

Collected by Marie Lyn Bernard, via retronaut

This is an amazing collection. I think what excites me so much about it, apart from the PDAs which indicate these are clearly romantic relationships and not just friendships, is the women of colour who are included. No 2 is even an inter-racial couple!

To add to this relationships such as these were able to be visible because during this era women were considered sex-less, that is that they did not have sex, so they could only have innocently amorous relationships with other women. In addition, in the late Victorian/early Edwardian era there was a large lesbian subculture where women had openly butch/femme relationships where one partner would often pass as a male and would accompany the other woman in public and be her escort to events and the like. Within that culture were femme/femme relationships, and sometimes butch/butch relationships. This practice was surprisingly popular among the higher class, where it was seen as entertainment for the women involved by the outside world. This culture was also accompanied by theatrical instances of cross-dressing lesbians who often became very famous. On the more extreme side of the culture were groups of high class women who had large balls that essentially would boil down to lavish orgies.

For the middle class, however, it was very easy for women to be in such relationships with little questioning as women were encouraged to live together as living with a male who was not family was immoral, and those who chose to be ‘spinsters’ often lived with a close friend. Often times in these situations the women would be in a relationship, where in some cases one partner would cross-dress though that was not always the case. When women lived together, it was rarely seen as questionable if the two became very close, and women were encouraged to have these sorts of relationships.

I’ve gotten many asks regarding depictions of queer people of color from art history. While that’s certainly under the purview of this blog, it’s not the main focus, and I know a lot of people would like to see and learn more. fyeahqueervintage seems mostly inactive now, but there are years’ worth of fairly quality posts, with an archive if you want to skim for something specific or your own personal interests or eras. The focus seems to be what is thought  of as “Western”, but there are still multi- and cross-cultural perspectives included, and certainly queer people of color from history.

Nov 6 '13
Nov 1 '13
"The working class are more numerous than the ruling class, and stronger. They depend on us for everything. We provide their food and build their houses and make their clothes, and without us they die. They can’t do anything unless we let them. Always remember that."
Fall of Giants by Ken Follett  (via bibliojungle)
Nov 1 '13

twooforjoy:

ive waited all year to be able to reblog this